Various projects from the past and ones I am currently working on. I am both a scientist and an artist, and much of my art is inspired by concepts in science and things I find interesting from various cultures past and present around the world.

12th September 2014

Photo with 4 notes

Sheep skeleton I found in a ravine walking survey last summer outside Rangely, Colorado. Wish I’d taken the skull with me but I didn’t have the means to transport it at the time, unfortunately.

Sheep skeleton I found in a ravine walking survey last summer outside Rangely, Colorado. Wish I’d taken the skull with me but I didn’t have the means to transport it at the time, unfortunately.

Tagged: archaeologybonescrmsheepvulture culturezooarchaeology

11th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Canuckin' with 7,198 notes

asylum-art:

Splendid Wood Cutout Sculptures by Martin Tomsky

on deviantART \  Etsy

London-based artist Martin Tomsky creates elaborate illustrations that are then transformed into beautifully intricate wooden sculptures.

Source: asylum-art

4th September 2014

Quote reblogged from Hattie Watson with 954 notes

It doesn’t interest me what you do for a living. I want to know what you ache for – and if you dare to dream of meeting your heart’s longing. It doesn’t interest me how old you are. I want to know if you will risk looking like a fool – for love – for your dreams – for the adventure of being alive.
— Oriah Mountain Dreamer (via arzitekt)

Source: arzitekt

2nd September 2014

Post reblogged from with 539,795 notes

broadway-aradia:

i really want to carry a torch in a cave just like one time

Source: seven-lilies

1st September 2014

Post reblogged from Look Out Below with 10,239 notes

shout out to minimum wage workers have to work on labor day so folks with cushy desk jobs can have the day off.

Source: nowsoonlater

1st September 2014

Post reblogged from None of Your Neurons [in the field until 25/9/14] with 133,478 notes

readmore-worryless:

"Too many books?" I believe the phrase you’re looking for is "not enough bookshelves".

Source: readmore-worryless

1st September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Canuckin' with 237,108 notes

affectedline:

hellbunnyshutch:

Reblogging because this actually is a thing that should concern more people. 

^^^^

Source: gerhard-martin

28th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Look Out Below with 33 notes

memoirsofanatom:

Chert knife lashed to a wooden handle
Yurok, 18th century AD From California, North America
This knife was probably used by the Yurok of northern California, especially for the preparation of salmon, both for broiling and preservation by smoking.
The Yurok and Karuk live along the Klamath river. Though they speak different languages, they share a common material culture and similar legends about the origins of salmon. Many stories tell of mythological heroes, ikhareya, who inhabited the earth before the arrival of human beings and created animals. Early in the twentieth century, a Karok elder, Sweet William of Ishipishi, told the anthropologist Alfred Kroeber about a hero called Sugar Loaf Mountain. He created salmon, and kept them in a pool. When they grew he allowed them down to the ocean, and then to return upriver. He created a net to catch the salmon, and a club to kill them with. At first he had no knife and could only cook the salmon whole. Finally another creature Fish Hawk or Chukchuk decided to make a yuhirim or stone knife. He created a taharatar, a flint flaker, so that when people arrived on earth they would be able to make knives, keep them sharp, and prepare the fish properly.
The knife was probably collected on George Vancouver’s voyage in 1791-95 at the village of Tsurai or Trinidad.

memoirsofanatom:

Chert knife lashed to a wooden handle

Yurok, 18th century AD
From California, North America

This knife was probably used by the Yurok of northern California, especially for the preparation of salmon, both for broiling and preservation by smoking.

The Yurok and Karuk live along the Klamath river. Though they speak different languages, they share a common material culture and similar legends about the origins of salmon. Many stories tell of mythological heroes, ikhareya, who inhabited the earth before the arrival of human beings and created animals. Early in the twentieth century, a Karok elder, Sweet William of Ishipishi, told the anthropologist Alfred Kroeber about a hero called Sugar Loaf Mountain. He created salmon, and kept them in a pool. When they grew he allowed them down to the ocean, and then to return upriver. He created a net to catch the salmon, and a club to kill them with. At first he had no knife and could only cook the salmon whole. Finally another creature Fish Hawk or Chukchuk decided to make a yuhirim or stone knife. He created a taharatar, a flint flaker, so that when people arrived on earth they would be able to make knives, keep them sharp, and prepare the fish properly.

The knife was probably collected on George Vancouver’s voyage in 1791-95 at the village of Tsurai or Trinidad.

Source: britishmuseum.org

28th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Melodie Gore Undercover with 170,657 notes

shogunofyellow:

nature is rad

Source: shogunofyellow

26th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Speaker for the Dead with 232 notes

eileenmaksym:

obsessedwithskulls:

Good morning!
http://fineartamerica.com/featured/coffee-break-carrieann-reda.html

Me before my first cup of the day…

eileenmaksym:

obsessedwithskulls:

Good morning!

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/coffee-break-carrieann-reda.html

Me before my first cup of the day…

Source: obsessedwithskulls